Covid-19 in the UK: How many coronavirus cases are there in my area?

Covid-19 in the UK: How many coronavirus cases are there in my area?

By The Visual and Data Journalism TeamBBC NewsThere have been nearly 14 million confirmed cases of coronavirus in the UK and more than 149,000 people have died, government figures show. However, these figures include only people who have died within 28 days of testing positive for coronavirus.So far, 90% of people aged 12 and over…

By The Visual and Data Journalism Team
BBC News

There have been nearly 14 million confirmed cases of coronavirus in the UK and more than 149,000 people have died, government figures show.

However, these figures include only people who have died within 28 days of testing positive for coronavirus.

So far, 90% of people aged 12 and over in the UK have had their first vaccine dose, 83% have had their second and 60% have had a booster.

During the Christmas holiday period the publication of Covid data by UK nations has been intermittent. It is likely that a full national picture will only be available towards the end of the first week of January.

Find out how the pandemic has affected your area and how it compares with the national average:

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Daily cases rising sharply

After a steady rise in November, there was a sharp increase in daily confirmed cases in December, driven by the new Omicron variant.

A further 194,747 confirmed cases were announced on Wednesday.

The emergence of Omicron means restrictions are in place as a precaution across the UK. You can use our postcode look-up to check what the rules are where you live.

The red and orange areas on the map below show the places currently seeing the highest number of cases per 100,000 people. The map’s key was updated on 21 December to allow for rising case numbers.

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Vaccine rollout continuing

Almost 52 million people, 90% of those aged 12 and over in the UK, have now received a first dose of a vaccine.

The number of people who have received a second vaccine dose is now more than 47 million, or about 83% of people aged 12 and over.

So far, more than 34 million booster doses have been administered across the UK, with more than 29 million in England, three million in Scotland, 1.7 million in Wales and 800,000 in Northern Ireland.

The UK Health Security Agency has warned that two doses of a Covid vaccine are not enough to stop people catching the Omicron variant, but their scientists also say a booster vaccine is 88% effective at preventing people ending up in hospital with Covid.

The UK government said its target of offering a booster jab to every eligible adult by 31 December, had been met. But the prime minister and leaders in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland continue to urge those who have not yet had one, to “get boosted”.

No signs of daily deaths rising

There were 334 deaths within 28 days of a positive test reported on Wednesday.

Of those deaths, there were 316 in England, including those who died in hospital between 1 and 4 January that have not been previously reported. There were also 10 deaths in Wales, five in Scotland and three in Northern Ireland.

England has seen the majority of UK deaths since the pandemic began, with the total approaching 130,000.

Hospital numbers rising

The most recent government figures for the whole of the UK show 17,276 people with coronavirus were in hospital on 4 January, up from 10,937 a week earlier.

Of those in hospital with coronavirus, 911 are in mechanical ventilation beds – using ventilators to help them breathe – up from 851 a week earlier.

Although the number of hospital patients has started to rise again, it remains below the peak of nearly 40,000 people in January last year.

The number of patients in hospital with coronavirus has started to increase across the UK now, most notably in London.

Death toll could be over 170,000

When looking at the overall death toll from coronavirus, official figures count deaths in three different ways, each giving a slightly different number.

First, government figures – the ones reported each day – count people who died within 28 days of testing positive for coronavirus. This figure is more than 149,000.

According to the latest ONS figures, the UK has now seen more than 173,000 deaths in total – that’s all those deaths where coronavirus was mentioned on the death certificate even if the person had not been tested for the virus.

The third measure counts all deaths over and above the expected number since the pandemic began – that figure was nearly 150,000 as of 17 December.

In total, there were 14,102 deaths registered in the week to 17 December, which was 14% above the five-year average.

What is the R number?

The “R number” is the average number of people an infected person will pass the disease on to.

If R is below one, then the number of people contracting the disease will fall; if it is above one, the number will grow.

The government has said in the past that the R number is one of the most important factors in making policy decisions.

The latest R number estimate for England is 1.0 to 1.2, for Scotland it is 1.0 to 1.3 and for Wales and Northern Ireland it is 0.9 to 1.1.

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