Newspaper headlines: Rwanda plan ‘will fail’ and ‘SAS train Kyiv forces’

Newspaper headlines: Rwanda plan ‘will fail’ and ‘SAS train Kyiv forces’

By BBC NewsStaffImage caption, Reaction to the UK government’s plan to transport some asylum seekers to Rwanda leads the i newspaper. It reports that people seeking to cross the Channel say they are worried but not deterred. A Sudanese man tells the paper he will attempt the crossing again, adding: “Sometimes you arrive, sometimes you…

By BBC News
Staff

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Reaction to the UK government’s plan to transport some asylum seekers to Rwanda leads the i newspaper. It reports that people seeking to cross the Channel say they are worried but not deterred. A Sudanese man tells the paper he will attempt the crossing again, adding: “Sometimes you arrive, sometimes you die.”

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“Rwanda plan will fail” is the Guardian’s headline, which quotes the UN’s refugee agency as saying the proposal is an unworkable “symbolic gesture”. An assistant high commissioner at the UN agency tells the paper the plan would only accommodate a few hundred people a year, adding that it would be extremely expensive as well as illegal and discriminatory.

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The Daily Mirror focuses on the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s “secret visit” to see the Queen at Windsor Castle. It says the pair promised to bring their children, Archie and Lilibet, to meet their grandmother at another visit in the “near future”.

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The main picture on the Times front page is Meghan dressed in white at the Invicta Games in the Netherlands, but the paper’s lead story focuses on Ukraine – where it says SAS troops have been training local forces. The Times says Ukrainian commanders say British special forces were instructing soldiers near Kyiv as recently as last week.

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The Daily Telegraph’s lead story says devices to restrict speed could become compulsory in all new British cars, reducing engine power or setting off alarms if drivers exceed the road’s speed limit. The paper says the measure, if adopted, would bring the UK in line with a European Union ruling and quotes one Tory MP describing it as “Big Brother in your cockpit”.

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“Boomtime!” exclaims the Daily Express, as it reports that people spending the sunny Easter break within the UK rather than travelling abroad are set to deliver a £2bn boost to the economy. The paper says the warm weather during the first Easter free of Covid restrictions for two years will spark a “spending frenzy”.

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An image of a shirtless man clutching inflatables on the beach leads the Daily Star as it covers a different Easter weekend story: A warning from “seaside spoil-sports” that despite the hot weather, the sea is so cold that it could cause a fatal shock for swimmers. “Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water”, is the paper’s headline.

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The Daily Mail reports that tens of thousands of civil servants are being allowed to work from home indefinitely. Some staff are only required to work two days a week in the office, the paper says.

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And the Financial Times reports on the attempted hostile takeover of Twitter by the world’s richest man, Tesla boss Elon Musk. The paper says the social media company has launched a “poison pill” defence, designed to block Mr Musk from buying more than 15% of the company’s shares.

“Rwanda plan will fail,” is the headline on the front of the Guardian, which highlights the UN refugee agency’s condemnation of the government’s decision to send asylum seekers to the east African country.

Gillian Triggs, an assistant high commissioner at the UNHCR, tells the paper that the proposed arrangement would only accommodate a few hundred people a year, making it extremely expensive, as well as illegal and discriminatory.

Ministers have insisted the scheme will save money in the “longer term”.

The i newspaper says that Channel migrants will still try to make the crossing to Kent, despite the threat of being sent to Rwanda.

Among them is a Sudanese man, living in a tent in Calais with his wife and son, who tells the paper of his plans to try again to cross the sea: “Sometimes you arrive, sometimes you die.”

Image source, Getty Images

According to the Daily Telegraph, Home Secretary Priti Patel is facing a “staff mutiny” over the controversial scheme, after the paper says a top mandarin formally challenged its value for money.

The Telegraph says unions representing staff in Whitehall have warned of mass walk-outs, and transfer requests, over the ethical and legal implications of the policy.

The paper says that even Labour voters are more likely to support the policy than oppose it, potentially causing problems for the party’s leader, Sir Keir Starmer.

The paper says Ukrainian commanders have told it that serving British special forces have given training to officers from two battalions stationed in and around Kyiv, in the past two weeks.

The Ministry of Defence has not commented on the story.

The Financial Times leads on Twitter’s “poison pill” strategy, to try to “thwart” Elon Musk from taking over the social media company.

The paper says Twitter’s “aggressive move”, which makes it harder for the billionaire to increase his stake above 15%, looks set to damage his hopes of buying the group.

The Daily Mail reports that tens of thousands of civil servants are being allowed to carry on working from home indefinitely.

An investigation by the paper has found that at least 20 government agencies and Whitehall departments have policies whereby staff are expected to be at the office “just two days a week”, despite ministers urging a return for the sake of the economy.

“We’ll bring the kids soon,” is the Daily Mirror’s headline, after Prince Harry and Meghan visited the Queen on their way to the Invictus Games in the Netherlands.

The paper says “Lilibet 1” will get to meet her namesake great-grandchild “at last”.

Image source, Getty Images

The Sun says the Duke of Sussex was behind the “clear-the-air” meeting at Windsor Castle with Prince Charles and the Queen on Thursday.

“When Harry went Pally,” is how the paper sums up the “olive branch” visit.

It’s “boomtime”, according to the Daily Express – and it’s all due to stay-at-home Britons.

The paper says families who have snubbed foreign trips for an Easter holiday in the UK are set to boost the economy to the tune of £2bn as they “spend, spend, spend”.

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